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Fujitsu

United States

32. Supply the same information in text when presenting something in audio.

Persons with hearing disabilities cannot decipher information presented in audio format. When you do things like only provide presentations in narration and slides, allow the information to be understood by also providing a visual form such as text.

Example and Implementation

  • Provide text display for your audio data.
  • It is acceptable to present the text at the same time as the audio data. It is also all right to abbreviate the audio when it is fast.
  • There is no need to add text information for BGM or sound responses to actions (except errors or warnings).

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33. Provide the same information in text or audio for animated graphics.

Persons with visual disabilities cannot decipher information contained in animated graphics which have no audio. Provide text which can be read aloud or audio, thus enabling the information to be understood using the sense of hearing.

Example and Implementation

  • Provide text or audio which explains the content of the animated data.
  • It is acceptable to present the text at the same time as the animated data. It is also all right to abbreviate the animation when it is fast.
  • Sound should be provided at the same time as animation.

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34. Enable users to control audio data for animations by allowing them to play, stop and adjust the volume. Provide clear controls within the content.

Persons with visual or hearing disabilities and the elderly can either miss or fail to hear information in animations and audio. Allow them to replay and listen again, to stop it and listen again later.

Example and Implementation

Provide controls for important audio and animated data, such as play, stop, fast-forward and rewind. (It is all right to have plug-in controls used when using a plug-in.) - It is unnecessary to provide controls for banner advertisements or animated GIFs with only a single stanza.