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Women in Technology

Women in Technology

Our events explore the latest thinking in digital transformation - Contact us for more informationRead blog articles

The proportion of women in IT currently stands at just 18% - woefully low considering the scale of the industry and the career potential we know it affords.

There is increasing ‘noise’ in the market about the rise of female executives, and we are seeing an increase in female decision makers in our customer base and in the market as a whole.

Fujitsu’s Women in Technology programme started in June 2013 with a view to bringing together female executives from across the Fujitsu customer and target base to explore the challenge of attracting females to the ICT profession – and nurturing and retaining their talent.

Save the date - join us at our next event

No Woman is an Island - Wednesday 14th November 2017 in Central London, 17:00 – 21:00
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At our next Women in Technology event we will explore the implications of the hyperconnected world, our relationship with technology – and with our network. We will consider the multiplying connections we are all making on a daily basis and consider whether there is potential to create genuine benefit from them.

Find out more and register for this event.

Highlights from our latest events

March 2017 - What can we learn from tech entrepreneurs?
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The challenge of attracting women to the technology sector – particularly in ‘traditional’ organisations - is well-documented. But is it any different in the start-up world?

At our latest women in technology event we were joined by Emma Sinclair, an entrepreneur and businesswoman who at 29 was the youngest person to have floated a company on the London Stock Exchange. Emma was described by Tatler as a tech leader who will be ‘running the universe one day’.

As markets are disrupted and transformed increasingly by digital, more and more women with an interest in technology are choosing not to take structured roles in IT departments but to create tech start-ups that will shake up markets and deprive traditional industries of their talents.

We explored the positives and negatives of female tech entrepreneurship, the characteristics required to be an entrepreneur, and its implications for diversity in the technology world.

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October 2016 - The role of Women in Technology in the workplace of the future
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At this event we discussed the changing workplace and what it means for women in technology. We all know the workplace is changing – nothing new in that. In the past decade the concept of ‘work’ has transformed from being ‘somewhere you go’ to ‘something you do’. Many organisations have been busy focusing on implementing the technologies to make it possible to work flexibly, virtually and collaboratively remotely.

Not all are having great success – they have the tools to work anywhere, but don’t necessarily have the culture to support it, with resistance to flexible, remote working still being prevalent in many organisations. If there were more women in senior roles, would there be more emphasis on culture, and acceptance of the benefits of flexibility?

In a lively discussion led by Harriet Minter of The Guardian’s Leadership section, and Fujitsu’s CEO for UK & Ireland, we discussed the challenge of implementing flexible working. Harriet Minter argued for women – and men – to make the business case for flexible working before it becomes ‘a child care’ issue. So often, requests for flexibility are associated with family issues and stigmatised so that they are perceived to be ‘career limiting’.

The benefits of flexibility, when implemented effectively, completely outweigh any perceived disadvantages, and with the technology and tools to enable a ‘workplace anywhere’ mentality, it’s becoming a no-brainer in the digital era.

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Key Event Programmes

Executive Discussion Evenings
Woment in Technology
Fujitsu Forum
Fujitsu World Tour